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How to Use ‘Kaiten’ Sushi

19 Jan

Infographics really are a wonderful accomplishment of the internet. They are a fantastic educational tool because they present information in an easily disgestible format, and more importantly they are great to look at! Here is one created by Trip Advisor Japan on how to use kaiten sushi  回転寿司, also known as a sushi train.

tripadvisor_kaitensushi

Source: Trip Advisor Japan

ごめんなさい!

19 Jan

It has been a long time since we lasted updated Nihongo Hub, and for that we say ごめんなさい!(gomennasai) Sorry! Last year was such a busy year for us that we didn’t have many opportunties to post updates, reviews and resources to help with learning Japanese. Fortunately, we did manage to find a tonne of great native Japanese language and language learning resources that we will  start posting shortly!

Quick Kanji 2 – 竜 & 龍

2 Mar

Consider the following two kanji 竜 and 龍. Both are read as リュウ (ryuu) and both pertain to the giant, fearsome mythical creature known in English as simply the dragon. In modern Japanese both kanji can be found fairly easily, though 竜 is more popular (more on that in a bit).

So you might be thinking why are there two kanji for dragon…well, 竜 is considered to be the simplified and more popular form of 龍, which is said to be the more archaic of the two (known in Japanese as 旧漢字. There are quite a few kanji like this – 国 & 國, 黒 & 黑 and 舟 & 船). The modern, simplified version is the most accepted version, though 龍 is also allowed to be used in names. Strictly speaking in Japanese they actually have the same meaning, though further investigation does uncover some differences in their etymology and the nuance that they both convey.

For the sake of everyone’s sanity let’s start off by stating the obvious – dragons are NOT real – but you could say that there are actually two types of dragon. First we have the dragon that existed in medieval Europe and soared through the skies indiscriminately roasting innocent townsfolk, knights in shining armour and anything else that moved. Think the Welsh flag and Harry Potter.

The second type of dragon we have comes from the East, that is, China. More serpent-like than its European cousin and supposedly more placid, Chinese dragons are more likely to live around water and frolic in waterfalls in their spare time. Their heads are more crocodilian with a couple of deer-like antlers on top with short stocky legs.

The general consensus seems to be that 竜 is associated with dragons from the West whereas 龍 tends to refer to oriental dragons. A quick search of either kanji in Google Images also gives you a similar result (although not exactly academic…). However there really isn’t a need to make this kind of subtle distinction in your use of the two kanji. It’s actually best to use 竜 given that it is the most widely accepted form, unless the situation governs that you should use 龍 instead. As an example, consider the following words; 青龍 (せいりゅう – blue Chinese dragon), 烏龍茶 (ウーロンちゃ – oolong tea) and 恐竜 (きょうりゅう – dinosaur).

So while we don’t recommend losing sleep over whether you should be using 竜 or 龍 (if you see either in the wild, RUN!) it is important to recognise the history and unique stories that kanji have to tell. Understanding this background knowledge is not only interesting but can really help you to appreciate the language you are learning.

 

 

5 Really Useful Japanese Onomatopoeia

3 Feb

Like the English language, Japanese has quite a number of words used to express sounds, words which are known as onomatopoeia. Some common English onomatopoeia are words like ‘bang’, ‘crash’ or ‘boom’. However the Japanese have perfected these words into an art form that they are no longer used to only represent sounds, but also emotions, people’s behaviour and the state of objects.

In Japanese these words are known as 擬声語 (giseigo) and can be broken down into a couple of groups. The two we are interested in are 擬音語 (giongo), which represent sounds such as a dog’s bark or a door slamming, and 擬態語 (gitaigo), which are used for behaviour and emotions. Words similar to gitaigo don’t really exist in English; instead we tend to use an adverb to give a person’s behaviour the characteristics of something else. Think sluggishly and sheepishly. On the other hand, the sound of a gitaigo word represents the way someone does something or how they feel. ニコニコ笑う (niko niko warau)  means to smile while くすくす笑う (kusu kusu warau) means to chuckle to oneself. To different actions but both use the verb 笑う (warau) meaning ‘to laugh/smile’.

What’s more, these words are actually quite common in everyday spoken and written Japanese so it pays to know a few of the more common ones. If you use these words your Japanese will sound much more lively and natural, and they really help to emphasise what you’re talking about. They are also kind of fun to say because in English we don’t really have anything that sounds like these words at all. In this post we are going to focus on some 擬態語 (gitaigo). Here’s five to get you started.

1. ゆっくり – ‘Yukkuri’ is one of the most common gitaigo you will hear, and it means to do something slowly, calmly or restfully. It can be used with any number of verbs, for example ゆっくり歩く (yukkuri aruku) to walk slowly, ゆっくり食べる (yukkuri taberu) to eat slowly or ゆっくり考える (yukkuri kangaeru) to think slowly about something/to think something over. It can even be used with the verb する to mean ‘not really doing much of anything, just taking your time to do as you please’.

2. びっくり – ‘Bikkuri’ is another word you will hear ALL OF THE TIME. It’s used when you’re surprised or shocked about something and is paired with する.  You bump into your friend unexpectedly while getting some groceries, びっくりしました! Your teacher tells you that you aced that exam you were sure you had failed, びっくりしました! You get the picture. It’s a really versatile word and very very Japanese.

3. たっぷり – ‘Tappuri’ is often used with food and means ample or plenty. A sign advertising a new donburi outside a restaurant might read 牛肉たっぷり! (gyuuniku tappuri) meaning ‘there is heaps and heaps of beef in this!’ or you might see お野菜をたっぷり入りました on the menu of a Chinese restaurant, which essentially means ‘We’ve put a lot of veggies in this’.

4. ぐっすり – ‘Gussuri’ is used with the verb 寝る (neru) to sleep and together they mean to sleep soundly, or to be in a deep sleep. A useful one to remember when you’re telling your friends how you slept after your night out at karaoke.

5. こっそり – ‘Kossori’ means to do something sneakily or stealthily and generally has a negative connotation to it. For example こっそり入る (kossori hairu) means to come in/enter sneakily. We could be talking about a burglar entering a house or a teenager sneaking back inside after going out. Another example is こっそり見る (kossori miru) meaning to sneak a glance. You could use it to say you looked at your friend’s answers in an exam or took a peek inside a closed door.

So there you have it! Five new words that will really help to lift your Japanese and make it a touch more expressive. We’ll bring you some more of these words soon since there are A LOT more of them out there.

Nihongo Hubへようこそ!

30 Jan

ようこそ and welcome to Nihongo Hub! This website has been developed to be your ultimate site for resources for both students and teachers of the Japanese language. We here at Nihongo Hub will be gathering, reviewing and posting about a wide range of learning resources that we hope you will find useful in your quest to master Japanese. We will cover a huge range of resources, ranging from the traditional, but always well-loved, textbook to more modern learning resources such as podcasts and apps. All learners of Japanese from the beginner right up to the seasoned veteran will find something useful here as we look at resources aimed at casual learners, high school and university students, Japanese Language Proficiency Test examinees, and of course senseis themselves. We love hearing from our readers, whether it be their thoughts on a great (or not so great) resource they use, tips and techniques they have for learning Japanese, or in fact just anything Japan or Japanese related! みんなさん、頑張りましょう! (Minna san, ganbarimashou! Let’s do our best!)

 

We’d love to welcome you while wearing a Toripi character suit from Tottori Prefecture, but unfortunately we don’t have one.